About Editing and Writing http://jacklimpert.com a blog by Jack Limpert, Editor of The Washingtonian for more than 40 years. Fri, 23 Jun 2017 22:49:02 +0000 en-US hourly 1 When You’re Trying to Figure Out Who Will Make a Good Journalist http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/trying-figure-will-make-good-journalist/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/trying-figure-will-make-good-journalist/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 15:41:41 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9825 In 40 years at the Washingtonian, I looked at thousands of resumes, many from applicants to the magazine’s internship program, and every editor has his or her own ideas of what kind of person will make a good journalist. I suspect I differed from many editors in that I mostly ignored the education part of  […]

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In 40 years at the Washingtonian, I looked at thousands of resumes, many from applicants to the magazine’s internship program, and every editor has his or her own ideas of what kind of person will make a good journalist.

I suspect I differed from many editors in that I mostly ignored the education part of  resumes. I glanced at it but never thought good grades at a top school had much to do with the kind of common sense intelligence needed to be a good reporter and writer. That thinking was reinforced by a conversation with a senior lawyer at one of Washington’s top law firms. He said he had learned to be wary of top law school graduates—as judged by grades. “They’re great in the library but couldn’t try a case if their life depended on it.”

With intern applications, I looked with the most interest at summer jobs. The first deal breaker was an applicant being a lifeguard at the local country club pool—the kind of job where you’re just hanging out with the kind of people you already know. I liked kids who had worked at real jobs that brought them in contact with different kinds of people and taught them what real work and real life was about.

You do need a b.s. detector when reading resumes. One of our daughters, when she was a sophomore in a well-known DC high school, said that the kids talked a lot about what could they do in the summer that would like good on their college applications. Did the applicant just build a nice resume that suggested little real engagement with different kinds of people?

We put a lot of effort into finding good interns because a fair number of them stayed on at the magazine or came back after several years elsewhere as editors or writers. We always thought evaluating someone over a three or four month internship was the best way to find good staff. I told many of them, “Keep in touch with us, let us know what you’re doing,” hoping that at some point they might come back.

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The Night the Football Star Told the Supreme Court Justice: “Loosen up, Sandy baby.” http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/night-football-star-told-supreme-court-justice-loosen-sandy-baby/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/night-football-star-told-supreme-court-justice-loosen-sandy-baby/#comments Wed, 21 Jun 2017 13:52:11 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9818 By Ron Cohen In 40-plus years as a journalist, I wrote about wars, assassinations, elections, tornadoes, plane crashes, fires, floods, volcanoes, moonwalks. I interviewed presidents, wannabe presidents, movie stars, several governors who wound up wearing orange prison jump suits, best-selling authors, hall-of-fame sports figures. Not to mention a dark-haired woman who regularly had been smuggled […]

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By Ron Cohen

Two UPI legends: Ron Cohen toasts Helen Thomas.

In 40-plus years as a journalist, I wrote about wars, assassinations, elections, tornadoes, plane crashes, fires, floods, volcanoes, moonwalks. I interviewed presidents, wannabe presidents, movie stars, several governors who wound up wearing orange prison jump suits, best-selling authors, hall-of-fame sports figures.

Not to mention a dark-haired woman who regularly had been smuggled into the White House, under Jackie’s nose, for middle-of-the-night dalliances with John F. Kennedy.

But the story that caused the biggest sensation: John Riggins and Sandra Day O’Connor.

Google the words “Loosen up, Sandy baby” and you will find several hundred references to the night of February 1, 1985, when John Riggins, star running back for the Washington Redskins, and Sandra Day O’Connor, first woman Supreme Court justice, found themselves at the same table at a formal dinner.

I was an organizer of the Washington Press Club’s annual dinner, which honors members of Congress—even if they haven’t done anything particularly honorable, which these days is most of the time.

The dinner, that year in the ballroom of a Sheraton Hotel, is a big event on Washington’s social calendar. Journalists and members of Congress, women dressed in long evening gowns and men in tuxedos like strutting penguins, mingle at an hour-long schmooze-fest masquerading as a cocktail party. Then after dinner several newly elected members of Congress, chosen for their supposed wit, attempt to entertain the crowd. Occasionally one is funny.

Here’s what happened that night:

John Riggins, a sports hero in Washington, had been invited by Time magazine. Other guests at the Time table included Justice O’Connor and her husband, John.

Sandra Day O’Connor: Role model for women clawing to break through the glass ceiling of jobs historically reserved for men. One of the world’s most respected women. Reserved and proper. Tight lips, tight smile. Prim, formal, aloof. Nary a blonde curl awry.

John Riggins: Outgoing, outspoken, outrageous. Funny, profane, brutish. Motorcycles his preferred mode of transportation. The hairdos under his football helmet ran from Mohawk to six inches of Afro. At 6-foot-4 and 245 pounds, he’d rather flatten tacklers than evade them.

Placing the two at one table was begging for combustion. Riggins knocking down more than a few before dinner was begging for disaster.

He stumbles, in tux and calf-high cowboy boots, into the hotel dining room. As he hunts for his seat in a sea of identical tables, guests bounce off him like undersized defensive backs.

My wife Jill and I are at the UPI table, next to the one where Time execs were entertaining their guests.

Riggins and O’Connor sit across from each other at the round  table. Riggins tries to engage her in long-distance conversation in a room buzzing with many hundreds of guests. Either she cannot hear him or chooses not to.

No matter how many times he tries to get her attention, she continues to give him the cold-shoulder.

His bleary eyes narrow and in a voice that could have been heard in an adjacent time zone he calls out:

“Loosen up, Sandy baby! You’re too tight!”

“Sandy baby” reacts as if she had been shoved into primordial ooze. In an attempt to regain the composure befitting a Supreme Court justice, she purses her lips even more tightly and continues to talk to her husband.

The Time editors seem too stupefied to intervene.

Riggins keeps drinking. At one point, during the soup course, he rises with some difficulty, mumbles something, takes a couple of shaky steps, crouches on his haunches—then slides slowly to the floor, coming to rest, outstretched, under Jill’s chair. And, quite noisily, he falls asleep.

“If I’d known I was going to be sleeping with John Riggins, I’d have worn my nightgown,” Jill said afterwards.

And she would tell a reporter from the Los Angeles Times:

“Then he squatted and was staring off into space. He was really out of it. He dropped to one elbow, then he was flat on the floor. I knew he was under my chair when his cowboy boots hit my shoes.”

As Vice President George H.W. Bush rose to deliver the evening’s closing remarks, snores and belches from the football star were audible.

I leave the ballroom to dictate a story to the UPI Washington bureau. “Loosen up, Sandy baby” dominates the first paragraph.

Surprisingly exclusive in a room filled with journalists, my story splashed on newspaper front pages the next morning. Radio and TV stations broadcast it on an endless loop.

Competitors scrambled to try to catch up, including the rival Associated Press.

An AP reporter made follow-up calls to guests at the UPI table, only to be told, “The AP? Are you kidding?”

Jill had a “Loosen up, Sandy baby” T-shirt made for me.

The T-shirt women in O’Connor’s morning exercise class presented her with one that said, “Loosen Up With the Supremes.”

That night would forever entwine the lives of Sandra Day O’Connor and John Riggins.

When he was inducted into the pro football Hall of Fame, news stories gave Riggins’s dinner antics nearly as much ink as his gridiron exploits.

And when O’Connor retired from the Supreme Court in 2005, reporters normally more familiar with the judicial system than the sports world wrote about “Loosen up, Sandy baby.”

Riggins launched a short-lived acting career after his gridiron days. In his Broadway audience on his first opening night was—yes, Sandra Day O’Connor.

After the show, in his dressing room backstage, she handed him a Sharpie and a new football.

The smile as he autographed it nearly tickled his earlobes.

And she grinned a “loosened up” grin right back at him.
—–
Excerpted from Ron Cohen’s new book, Of Course You Can Have Ice Cream for Breakfast!: A Journalist’s Uncommon Memoir. Published by Trafford Publishing, it’s available from Amazon in hardcover or paperback.

Cohen, who joined UPI in 1961 and became its managing editor, is also the author, with Gregory Gordon, of Down to the Wire: UPI’s Fight for Survival. Here’s the New York Times review of that book.

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The Twitterization of Print http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/twitterization-print-journalism/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/twitterization-print-journalism/#comments Mon, 19 Jun 2017 18:48:39 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9805 The Washington Post has a story today saying you shouldn’t eat lots and lots of French fries—dietary advice that won’t surprise many readers but in the Post’s Style section it became a front-page feature with the headline, “French fries could kill you, a new study says. But don’t panic!” The jump headline: “Frequent fry-eating is […]

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The Washington Post has a story today saying you shouldn’t eat lots and lots of French fries—dietary advice that won’t surprise many readers but in the Post’s Style section it became a front-page feature with the headline, “French fries could kill you, a new study says. But don’t panic!” The jump headline: “Frequent fry-eating is linked to death.”

It’s drawn from a study published last week in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition and to make it a talked-about Style story the writer, Tim Carman, got the National Potato Council to knock down the study as having “significant methodological flaws.” The study’s  lead author, Nicola Veronese, a scientist with the National Research Council in Padova, Italy, admitted that the finding was from a study of osteoarthritis patients and they were asked only to fill out a questionnaire. The author added,  “Other studies are needed of course.”

Pretty thin science journalism but what stopped me was Carman ending the piece with “You’re welcome, everyone,” that cute Twitter phrase that tells that the reader I’m sure you’d want to thank me for this.

In feature writing, the opening and ending are important. Carman’s lede tried hard: “Hey, you, the dude reading this story over a pile of French fries: Back slowly away from the crispy spuds. They’re out to get you.” But that ending—not what you’d expect from the Washington Post.
—–
The digital version of the Post story ends with “You’re welcome, Internet” with the print version ending “You’re welcome, everyone.”

 

 

 

 

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Dear Reader: You Should Know That We Have a Conflict of Interest Here http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/dear-reader-know-conflict-interest/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/dear-reader-know-conflict-interest/#comments Fri, 16 Jun 2017 14:43:18 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9798 With Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, owner of the Washington Post, now about to also own Whole Foods, will the Post’s Food section have to tread more carefully when writing about supermarkets? While editing the Washingtonian, I had to make a decision that caused me to think about the journalism ethics of publishing or not publishing something […]

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With Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, owner of the Washington Post, now about to also own Whole Foods, will the Post’s Food section have to tread more carefully when writing about supermarkets?

While editing the Washingtonian, I had to make a decision that caused me to think about the journalism ethics of publishing or not publishing something critical of Whole Foods.

Whole Foods had come to the Washington area, breaking the hold that the more mass-market chains, Giant and Safeway, had on food buying. Whole Foods seemed higher quality, more health conscious, perfect for upwardly mobile Washingtonians willing to pay higher prices.

A story came through that mentioned Whole Foods and the writer had added, parenthetically, “or as my friends call it Whole Paycheck.”

By then the area’s Whole Food stores were selling a decent number of newsstand copies of the Washingtonian. We  were sending Giant about 25,000 newsstand copies a month and it was selling about 15,000. We were sending Whole Foods, which had fewer stores, about 10,000 newsstand copies and it was selling about 8,000.

Do we let the “Whole Paycheck” reference go through, probably making readers smile but possibly angering Whole Foods and endangering the monthly sale of 8,000 newsstand copies?

I edited it out, sending the writer a note that we were always willing to go after companies such as Whole Foods on matters of substance—say, a story about food prices—but not necessarily on matters of style, no matter how clever the reference might be.

In other words, I thought the Whole Paycheck reference was the writer showing off, possibly angering Whole Foods and the sale of 8,000 newsstand copies a month just for the fun of it.

Good luck, Washington Post editors, sorting out the ethical dimensions of writing about issues that affect the increasing reach of Jeff Bezos. You’re likely have to be adding a lot more of those parenthetical full disclosures about possible conflicts of interest.
—–
6-17-17 Update: The Post’s page one story today, “Amazon-Whole Foods deal rattles the grocery industry,” has this disclosure at the end of the fifth graf: (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos owns The Washington Post.)

 

 

 

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The Most Important Thing an Editor Can Say Is No http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/important-thing-editor-can-say-no/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/important-thing-editor-can-say-no/#respond Wed, 14 Jun 2017 15:24:12 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9792 Oliver Stone defended Vladimir Putin to Stephen Colbert. The audience laughed at him. —Washington Post headline June 13, 2017 Laughing at Stone, not taking him seriously, is the right response to the sometimes brilliant film director when he ventures into politics. Here was my response to Stone in 1991 when he made the movie, JFK. […]

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Oliver Stone defended Vladimir Putin to
Stephen Colbert. The audience laughed at him.
Washington Post headline June 13, 2017

Laughing at Stone, not taking him seriously, is the right response to the sometimes brilliant film director when he ventures into politics.

Here was my response to Stone in 1991 when he made the movie, JFK.

WASHINGTON (AP)  Film critic Pat Dowell never wrote a review her editors wouldn’t run. But that was before she gave 3 1/2 stars to ”JFK.” She’s now the ex-critic of Washingtonian magazine, after resigning when editor Jack Limpert spiked her words of praise for the controversial movie.

”The idea that the president, the Pentagon and the CIA are all acting in concert” to assassinate John Kennedy and cover it up ”is bizarre, just crackpot, preposterous,” Limpert said Friday. His view after seeing the film: “The dumbest movie about Washington ever made.”

Dowell’s unpublished critique called it ”a brilliantly crafted indictment of history as an official story.’

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Unfair to President Trump? DC Journalists Have Talked It Over and We Don’t Agree. http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/unfair-washington-journalists-talked-96-percent-us-dont-agree/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/unfair-washington-journalists-talked-96-percent-us-dont-agree/#respond Mon, 12 Jun 2017 16:37:16 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9756 Washington Post columnist Margaret Sullivan today asked if media coverage of President Trump has been “terribly unfair,” as the President claimed in a commencement address to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy. Sullivan: “Here’s my carefully nuanced answer: Hell, no.” She says that negative vs. positive coverage of President Trump is the wrong question. She says: […]

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Washington Post columnist Margaret Sullivan today asked if media coverage of President Trump has been “terribly unfair,” as the President claimed in a commencement address to the U.S. Coast Guard Academy.

Sullivan: “Here’s my carefully nuanced answer: Hell, no.”

She says that negative vs. positive coverage of President Trump is the wrong question. She says:

The idea idea of balance is suspect on its face. Should positive coverage be  provided, as it were a birthright, to a president who consistently lies, who has spilled classified information to an adversary, and who fired the FBI director who was investigating his administration?

So unfairness to President Trump is not a Washington Post problem.

She goes on to write about a study by Thomas E. Patterson of Harvard about mainstream press coverage of President Trump’s first 100 days:

“The press is focusing on personality, not substance,” he said recently on public radio’s “On the Media” program. And that reflects “not a partisan bias but a journalistic bias,” the tendency to seek out conflict. (No mystery there — it’s more interesting.)“It’s the press in its usual mode, and that erodes public trust,” Patterson said.

And then there’s the dirty little secret that every journalist knows — Trump stories drive ratings and clicks. The word “Trump” in a headline vastly increases its chances of getting attention. (We’re all guilty; see above.)

Sullivan does not mention one chart in Patterson’s study:

Figure 9. Trump’s “Fitness for Office” Coverage by Outlet


In the November election, 96 percent of the residents of the District of Columbia didn’t vote for candidate Trump. And 96 percent of the Post stories about President-elect Trump were negative about his fitness for office.

So the Washington Post is reflecting the attitudes and feelings of its home base, the District of Columbia. (The DC suburbs also are trending increasingly Democratic.)

Why has the nation’s capital become so unwelcoming to Republicans? The old conventional wisdom has been that Republicans come to Washington when they win an election but go home when they lose, while Democrats never leave.

Maybe it’s also because it’s ever easier for Democrats to find work. Federal spending has gone from $2.2 trillion in 2000 to $3.9 trillion this year, and Washington is ever more anxious to help the rest of the country decide on everything from what restroom you can use to what your neighborhood school can teach.

The nation’s capital is increasingly more liberal—we love federal programs and federal spending—and we vote overwhelmingly for Democratic candidates and 96 percent of the time our daily newspaper questioned whether Republican Donald Trump was fit to be President. A balance problem? It’s worth discussing.

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Vic Gold Discovers the Real Business of Washington http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/vic-gold-discovers-real-business-washington/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/vic-gold-discovers-real-business-washington/#respond Sun, 11 Jun 2017 17:43:00 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9750 Vic moved to Washington in 1958 and joined the PR firm of Selvage & Lee where, as he recounted in his book, I Don’t Need You, his first assignment was to write promo articles for the Anhydrous Ammonia Association. He asked his boss what the association was; he was told, “Fertilizer lobby.” “Then why don’t […]

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Vic moved to Washington in 1958 and joined the PR firm of Selvage & Lee where, as he recounted in his book, I Don’t Need You, his first assignment was to write promo articles for the Anhydrous Ammonia Association. He asked his boss what the association was; he was told, “Fertilizer lobby.”

“Then why don’t they just call it the Bullshit Lobby?”

“Well, how would we tell it apart from the rest of them?”

—From “Vic Gold, An Appreciation,” on the Daily Kos.

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Notes from James Comey’s 6/8/17 Testimony Before the Senate Intelligence Committee http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/media-notes-james-comey-appearance-senate-intelligence-committee/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/media-notes-james-comey-appearance-senate-intelligence-committee/#respond Fri, 09 Jun 2017 18:54:06 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9744 Senator James Risch of Idaho: OK. So — so, again, so the American people can understand this, that report by the New York Times was not true. Is that a fair statement? Former FBI Director James Comey: In — in the main, it was not true. And, again, all of you know this, maybe the […]

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Senator James Risch of Idaho: OK. So — so, again, so the American people can understand this, that report by the New York Times was not true. Is that a fair statement?

Former FBI Director James Comey: In — in the main, it was not true. And, again, all of you know this, maybe the American people don’t. The challenge — and I’m not picking on reporters about writing stories about classified information, is that people talking about it often don’t really know what’s going on.

And those of us who actually know what’s going on are not talking about it. And we don’t call the press to say, hey, you got that thing wrong about this sensitive topic. We just have to leave it there.

Senator Tom Cotton of Arkansas: On February 14th, the New York Times published a story, the headline of which was, “Trump Campaign Aides Had Repeated Contacts With Russian Intelligence.”

You were asked earlier if that was an inaccurate story, and you said, in the main. Would it be fair to characterize that story as almost entirely wrong?

Comey: Yes.

Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri: So why didn’t you give those to somebody yourself, rather than give them through a third party?

Comey: Because I was worried the media was camping at the end of my driveway at that point, and I was actually going out of town with my wife to hide, and I worried it would be like feeding seagulls at the beach…

…if — if it was — if it was I who gave it to the media. So I asked my friend, “Make sure this gets out.”

Senator Angus King of Maine: All right. We’ll be having a closed session shortly, so we will follow up on that.

In terms of his comments to you about—I think in response to Mr. Risch—to Senator Risch, you said he said, “I hope you will hold back on that.” But when you get a—when a president of the United States in the Oval Office says something like “I hope” or “I suggest” or—or “would you,” do you take that as a—as a — as a directive?

Comey: Yes. Yes, it rings in my ear as kind of, “Will no one rid me of this meddlesome priest?”

King: I was just going to quote that. In 1170, December 29, Henry II said, “Who will rid me of this meddlesome priest?” and then, the next day, he was killed — Thomas Becket. That’s exactly the same situation. You’re—we’re thinking along the same lines.

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If a Mafia Boss Ran the Country? Vic Gold Saw the Possibilities http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/mafia-boss-ran-country-vic-gold-saw-coming/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/mafia-boss-ran-country-vic-gold-saw-coming/#comments Wed, 07 Jun 2017 19:17:06 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9709 Trump would have made a great mafia boss. Not sure he’s going to make a great president. —Ezra Klein on Twitter, June 7, 2017 — Vic Gold, who died Monday night after a long career in politics and journalism, wrote a 1980 Washingtonian story about what it’d be like if things got so bad that […]

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The Boss of Bosses takes the oath.

Trump would have made a great mafia boss. Not sure he’s going to make a great president.

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Vic Gold: He Brought a Lot of Wit and Laughter to Politics and Journalism http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/vic-gold-brought-lot-wit-laughter-politics-journalism/ http://jacklimpert.com/2017/06/vic-gold-brought-lot-wit-laughter-politics-journalism/#comments Tue, 06 Jun 2017 20:33:29 +0000 http://jacklimpert.com/?p=9693 Vic Gold, who wrote often about the media and politics for the Washingtonian, died last night after a short illness. He was 88. Here is Vic interviewing himself in a 2008 Washingtonian piece. An excerpt: If you were teaching a course in Washington 101, what textbooks would you use? Two come to mind, one fiction, […]

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Vic sometimes looked serious but inside he was smiling.

Vic Gold, who wrote often about the media and politics for the Washingtonian, died last night after a short illness. He was 88.

Here is Vic interviewing himself in a 2008 Washingtonian piece. An excerpt:

If you were teaching a course in Washington 101, what textbooks would you use?

Two come to mind, one fiction, one nonfiction. First, Robert Penn Warren’s All the King’s Men, the best novel ever written about the dynamics of power in American politics. My other would be Safire’s Political Dictionary, the liveliest one-volume summary of American electoral history a political junkie could ask for.

There’ll be a lot of new people coming to town this winter. A new administration, a new Congress. Any advice?

For young staffers in the White House and on the Hill: Don’t get too impressed with yourself and your position. Most of the mistakes I’ve made in life came out of taking myself too seriously. I learned, sometimes the hard way, that the best way to show how smart you are is to keep it to yourself. In this town you make enough enemies in the natural flow of events. There’s no point in making any gratuitously.

Vic grew up in New Orleans, graduated from Tulane, worked as a reporter for the Birmingham News, then went to law school at the University of Alabama—one of his classmates was Harper Lee and one of his lifelong friends was Charles “Chuck” Morgan, a fellow Birmingham lawyer who was instrumental in the Supreme Court establishing the “one man, one vote” principle. He loved sports, especially Bear Bryant and Alabama football and the St. Louis Cardinals baseball team. Here’s his Wikipedia entry for more details.

One of his first pieces for the Washingtonian, in June 1976, was “If Joe McGinniss Calls, Hang Up.” An excerpt:

In recent years the phrase the “New Journalism” has been applied to a variety of expanded reportorial forms. What I am talking about here is neither the investigative nor the interpretive/analytical variety as practiced by, say, Jerry Landauer or David Broder. What I refer is the illegitimate journaliterary form that offers readers a print version of the worst elements of the television documentary: distorted verbal closeups, zooms, dramatic splices. A minimum of genuine news content, a maximum of style and message. And, oh yes, bitter irony, especially as the story relates to the American Establishment.

The Editor’s Note on Vic that ran with that story:

Vic Gold’s reflections on the New Journalism as it slouches toward election day mark his second 1976 appearance in The Washingtonian—his Presidential scenario (“The Making of the President 1976”) appeared in March—and we hope you’ll be seeing more of him in issues to come. His wit always stings.

This month’s article represents a particularly happy bracketing of writer and material. Gold was assistant press secretary to Barry Goldwater in the 1964 presidential campaign and press secretary to Vice President Spiro Agnew from 1970 to 1973—experiences that contributed to Gold’s book I Don’t Need You when I’m Right. He is now at work on a book dealing with the public relations aspects of the 1976 presidential campaign. Entitled Super Tuesday, it will be published by Doubleday next May.

Gold no longer wants to be called a conservative; he considers himself a political agnostic. “In 1976,” he says, “that means I don’t believe in Jimmy Carter.”

Gold, 48, attended secondary schools in New Orleans and received a law degree from the University of Alabama in 1951. He practiced law in Birmingham from 1952 to 1958, when he abandoned law for public relations, and he subsequently headed a PR firm.

He now writes a newspaper column that is distributed nationally and is a commentator on ABC-TV’s “Good Morning America.” Married and the father of three, Gold lives in Falls Church.
—–

Vic’s daughter Paige says the funeral will be in Birmingham with a memorial service to follow in Washington. Updated information will be added as it becomes available.

Paige adds: The only additional thing you might include is that he served as speechwriter and political consultant to George H. W. Bush during his term as vice president, and co-wrote Bush’s autobiography Looking Forward.
—–
Vic was easily outraged and he wrote about many examples of what he saw as hypocrisy or stupidity in his blog, The Wayward Lemming.
—–
In March 2016, Vic was interviewed about the presidential race by Chuck Conconi for Focus: Washington. The video clip runs about 10 minutes.
—–
Vic’s obit in the June 8 Washington Post included this good description of him: “Short, intense and often irritable, he was once dubbed ‘the Mount Vesuvius of press secretaries’ for his outbursts, but he had a redeeming sense of humor and an appreciation of the theatricality of politics.”

 

 

The post Vic Gold: He Brought a Lot of Wit and Laughter to Politics and Journalism appeared first on About Editing and Writing.

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