Facebook, Google, and Amazon: Move Fast and Break Things

…we are in the midst of a technological revolution that has altered the flow of information….just a few companies have taken control, and this concentration of power—which Americans have acquiesced to without ever really intending to, simply by clicking away—is subverting our democracy.

Thirty years ago, almost no one used the Internet for anything. Today, just about everybody uses it for everything. Even as the Web has grown, however, it has narrowed. Google now controls nearly ninety per cent of search advertising, Facebook almost eighty per cent of mobile social traffic, and Amazon about seventy-five per cent of e-book sales. Such dominance, Jonathan Taplin argues, in “Move Fast and Break Things: How Facebook, Google, and Amazon Cornered Culture and Undermined Democracy” (Little, Brown), is essentially monopolistic. In his account, the new monopolies are even more powerful than the old ones, which tended to be limited to a single product or service. Carnegie, Taplin suggests, would have been envious of the reach of Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos.

—From “The Content of No Content: What Big Tech’s monopoly powers mean for our culture” by Elizabeth Kolbert in the August 28 New Yorker
Also see The Washington Post, Jeff Bezos, and Amazon: Together How High Can They Fly?


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